Version: primary May 2016 - Gemba Marketing

Summer is Coming: Gemba’s Essentials for Surviving the Heat!

Spirits are high at the Gemba office today. We drove to work with the windows down, the sun is shining, and Memorial Day Weekend is right around the corner. Life is real good. After seven months of hellish snow and ice, us northern folk welcome the holiday weekend with open, pasty white arms. It means summer is almost kind of hopefully here. It means grilling season is upon us. It means camping with friends, swimming in the lake, and cheering at the ball field, ice cream cone in hand. But to anyone working in the experiential field, Memorial Day Weekend represents the beginning of crammed calendars, outdoor activations, and a medley of summery events to execute. In fact, our team is headed to Atlanta and San Diego this week for a major activation! We’re busy, busy! Summer is experiential marketing’s best friend, and you best be prepared for the adventures that are about to be had. Here are some essentials you’ll need to pack in order to enjoy your events this season and survive the dog days of summer. Sunscreen: Pack it, use it, lather it on like you’re frosting a cake. The more, the better. The sun is dangerous, people, and if you’re not prepared, you’ll come home with a blistered nose and an epic farmer’s tan. And nobody likes a farmer’s tan. Water bottle: A long day in the sun is breeding ground for dehydration. And when you’re dehydrated, you’re crabby, you feel like mush, and your head probably aches like a son-of-a-gun. Tie a water bottle to your belt loop if you must, and drink water like it’s your...

We Felt the Feels at #EMSLive, and Here’s Why That’s A Good Thing

The energy was high at this year’s Experiential Marketing Summit hosted by Event Marketer. More than 1,500 marketing gurus gathered in Denver, CO to immerse themselves in the bustling trends and activations of the experiential marketing world, and the star of the show happened to be the one thing that connects us all – emotion. We cried, we laughed, we cried some more. But more importantly, we connected with likeminded, creative individuals who reminded us that our jobs – our roles as experiential marketers – matter. We’re not just a group of people who play the same marketing game and speak the same language. We’re innovators; we’re artists; we’re the developers of events that, when done well, transform into emotional experiences that have the potential to change perspectives and provide genuine value to people’s lives. Everything is an event; everything done well is an experience. ~Peter McGuinness, CMO, Chobani Our knowledge arsenal was stocked to the brim when we left Denver. We learned more than we thought we would, and we even mastered our ability to cry discreetly in public. So the entire experience was a solid success. In case you missed out on the whole shebang, we put together 5 takeaways every brand and agency should be aware of: 1. Use consumer lifestyle occasions as your marketing platform   It all ties back to your target consumer. People experience things differently. Whether they’re cheering at a football game or attending a Beyonce concert, consumers react to stimuli in completely different ways. Millennials and Baby Boomers don’t appreciate the same things – what matters to one might not even exist in the mind of...

5 Tips for Celebrating Mom in Your Next Marketing Campaign

This Sunday, we celebrate mom. We celebrate her loyal commitment to family, her abundance of support and love, and her irrefutable talent for baking chocolate chip cookies on the regular. As someone who has yet to experience the joys of motherhood, I don’t know what it’s like to care for a child or teach motherly lessons. I don’t know what it’s like to watch your daughter take her first steps or listen to your son say his first word. I know nothing about being a mom, other than the fact that it’s probably going to be the hardest, most wonderful thing I’ll ever do. In honor of Mother’s Day, I looked in to some of the characteristics and charming attributes of today’s mothers. And here’s what I do know – the average age of a first-time mom is 25.8. Which, for me, is alarming because, if I were shooting for average, I should be pregnant by July. Calm down, mom, it’s not happening anytime soon. What is happening, though, is a gradual shift in the purchasing power of the everyday mom. 83% of all new moms are millennials, meaning all those tech-savvy, culturally connected young folk are becoming parents, and they’re taking over the marketing world by storm. Millennial moms are one of the most influential marketing segments in history, raking in more purchasing power than any other generation, ever. Here are a few things to keep in mind when crafting campaigns around the millennial mom: They’re starving for time – the easier their life is made by your brand, the better. Show them you value their time and their duties as...

3 Steps for Creating Authentic Brand Experiences

This past weekend my husband and I visited a new brewery called Hop Lot Brewing Company. It’s located in Suttons Bay, MI; a quaint little town nestled on the banks of the Leelanau Peninsula. We had no idea what to expect, other than the fact that my hair stylist recommended we go and one of my coworkers said it was a “neat” place. No offense to said coworker, but “neat” is an unworthy adjective to describe such a marvel. Vintage cars are neat. The clearance aisles at Target are neat. Cake batter ice cream is neat. Hop Lot Brewing Company, however, is an establishment that can only be described as a place beer-fanatics go when they’re looking for a pint of heaven. It’s not neat. It’s freaking marvelous. We fell in love. Fast. But it wasn’t the beer itself that made our knees weak. It wasn’t the food or the cool apparel they had for sale, either. Although absolutely divine (ask my husband about their BLT sandwich), Hop Lot’s products were not the things that stole our hearts and sent us into a state of tranquility. Rather, it was the atmosphere; the vibe, the way it made us feel. It was the smell of the bonfires burning in the courtyard, the Mumford and Sons playing in the background, the laughter coming from the corn-hole area. It was the community picnic tables that encouraged friendly conversation with strangers, the gigantic green umbrellas, and the fact that the rushing cars from the nearby highway were muted by towering trees. It was as though we were transported to a campground in the middle of...