Version: primary October 2015 - Gemba Marketing

Boo from the Crew: Here’s How Team Gemba Does Halloween

Halloween is a time for candy, for scary movies, for thinking about the costumes of Halloweens come to pass and cringing at the memory. Here at Gemba, we’re no exception. In fact, we’re pretty much the rule, as you can see, if the rule is “Thou shalt not escape childhood without at least one seriously weird costume snafu.” Let’s do a little guessing game. Can you spot… The clown The Little Mermaid Superwoman The mouse The Cookie Monster The cheerleader Wednesday Addams Did you get them all? Congrats! You’re the Halloween champion. Go forth from this place with pride. Enjoy the candy (you deserve it), and we’ll see you in November. Happy...

2015 Halloween Predictions: Zombies Are the New Vampires

October is coming to an end, so let’s make with the Halloween costume predictions. Not even the tenth-anniversary release of a gender-bent Twilight novel can dethrone zombies as the pop culture Thing of the Moment. Thanks largely to the Walking Dead franchise (which spans comic books, video games, a popular TV show, and now a less-popular spin-off), zombies have topped vampires in terms of Halloween costume projections for adults and kids. We’re also looking at a possible plethora of superheroes, likely owing to the fact that we’re living in the Age of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. (It’s not that we aren’t grateful for Guardians of the Galaxy and Captain America: The Winter Soldier, but how many times do we have to see Spider-man’s origin story? How many Uncle Bens have to die before we understand that with great power comes great responsibility?) We’ll also be getting a parade of Elsas, Annas, Svens, and Olafs (Frozen); Han Solos, Princess Leias, and Yodas (Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens—is it December yet?); and minions (ugh. You know how I...

We Went to Content Marketing World, & It Was Pretty Spectacular

From the tech geekery of DreamForce to the alpacas of Outdoor Retailer—from Farm Progress in Illinois to Event Track in San Francisco—we’ve been to some cool conferences in our time. And our next stop on the conference circuit was Content Marketing World. You may have heard about this, because it dominated the Twitterverse for a solid week (#CMWorld). The annual conference is a coming together of content marketing wizards looking to share what they know and learn more. And what we learned is that there’s a lot of benefit to partnering up (“co-marketing,” as it were). One of the sessions that we felt was emblematic of the conference as a whole was Lisa Toner’s on leveraging marketing relationships. Here’s what we gathered. Why partner up? “Relationship marketing is when two entities join forces to create marketing that’s targeted to their mutual audience in order to achieve their respective goals.” For instance, HubSpot co-branded and co-promoted eBooks with LinkedIn, Twitter, and EventBrite, and they wound up generating three times’ as many leads. I guess the question becomes, well, why not partner up? So how do you find the right partner? Research, research, research. And when you’re perusing LinkedIn, Follerwonk, and Buzzsumo, rank potential partners in terms of: Reach Resonance Relevance Once you’ve found the right partner, what happens next? Good old-fashioned outreach. That’s what happens next. Send an email, introduce yourself, tell them what you’re thinking, and invite them to discuss the matter further over the phone. Be sure to include some idea or example of what’s in it for them. Once you’ve sealed the partnership deal, execute the campaign. Success! High-fives all around! Don’t forget to...

What’s Poppin’ with… Emily!

We’re back with What’s Poppin’, where I ask intrusive questions under a single beam of light in the conference room like it’s a police interrogation. This week I sat and chatted with Emily. She’s part of our fabulous creative team, but she has also killed a man. That’s not true. Well, it might be. I’ll let you come to your own conclusions. What’s your most useless talent? I can do the entire 8 Mile rap. When I mastered it, I was 13 or 14, and looking up lyrics on the Internet wasn’t a thing yet. So I literally sat down and listened to it over and over again, and painstakingly wrote down all the words. What’s your favorite word? Antidisestablishmenttarianism. Or maybe tenebristic. That can be my back-up. Has a book, movie, or TV show ever made you cry? My Little Princess, because I was so afraid her dad wouldn’t remember her. Also, the ending of LOST. How long would you last in the zombie apocalypse? Okay, so here’s the thing—my apocalypse is a lot harder than everybody else’s. If we’re being realistic about this, there won’t be a cure. There just won’t be. We’ll have nothing to achieve besides surviving slightly longer than everybody else. Within weeks, we’ll be outnumbered, and that’s only if we survive the first few crucial days where society just collapses and dissolves into anarchy. I’m gonna go a ways, but I’m going to die eventually. I’m not pessimistic—that’s just the reality. I completely agree. THANK you. I mean, we could hole up in a gas station for a little while. It’s well-stocked. But eventually—eventually—we’re gonna let our guard down, and we’re...

The Reason Why Apple Owns Our Souls

Since it’s Steve Jobs Day, and we’re hot off the heels of the latest Steve Jobs movie (Michael Fassbender is ten times’ the Steve Jobs that Ashton Kutcher ever was)… let’s talk about Apple. They’re a bastion of technological innovation and a force to be reckoned with, so they must have done something right. Turns out that “something” isn’t just about having a superior product. (You’ll know this if you’ve ever tried to do anything on iTunes at all and had to give up three frustrating hours later.) No, it’s not entirely about the product. It’s also about the marketing.   In this TED Talk (check out the complete, unedited version here), author Simon Sinek breaks down Apple’s (actually very simple) strategy: they prioritize the “why” of their company above their “how” and their “what.” Most businesses put their “what” above all else. If Apple did this, their opening line would simply be “We make great computers. They’re beautifully designed, simple to use, and user-friendly.” Now, here’s how they actually do things: 1. WHY: “In everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo. We believe in thinking differently.” 2. HOW: “The way we challenge the status quo is by making our products beautifully designed, easy to use, and user-friendly.” 3. WHAT: “We just happen to make great computers. Want to buy one?” Apple’s whole persona operates on the assumption that they are outside-the-box thinkers. That reverse order is essential to their success because it positions Apple as an innovative company challenging a status quo of old, tired products—and this is all before they’ve even told us what they’re offering. As Sinek explains, this...